I'm Not Living Here

Ask   Hi, my name is Thor. This blog has to do with my interests in the physical spaces we create and inhabit, and alternative ways of living. Home-made houses, off-the-grid homesteading, cabins, permaculture, tiny houses, creative interior design, stuff like that.

Why the modern bathroom is a wasteful, unhealthy design →
— 19 hours ago
frolicingintheforest:

How awesome is this?! (Seriously, CLICK the image, and look at how wonderful this place is!!) My Daddy built this for a good friend of his. It’s just a little getaway house for people to come stay in. There are bunk beds, a stove, deck, a bank of fossils, and a greattt swimming hole! Hopefully I’ll get to spend a weekend there soon! (: 

frolicingintheforest:

How awesome is this?! (Seriously, CLICK the image, and look at how wonderful this place is!!) My Daddy built this for a good friend of his. It’s just a little getaway house for people to come stay in. There are bunk beds, a stove, deck, a bank of fossils, and a greattt swimming hole! Hopefully I’ll get to spend a weekend there soon! (: 

(via tinyhousedarling)

— 1 week ago with 281 notes

hideback:

Madonna della Rocca, Taormina, Sicily

Sometime in the ancient past, this sacred mountain cave became a monastery. An Arab traveller mentions the site as early as 1154 AD. By 1640, the cave had been transformed into an elaborate chapel, “Madonna of the Rock.”

theofficialbillette

— 1 week ago with 69 notes

Build a natural swimming pool, and it’s cheaper.

— 3 weeks ago with 2 notes
drydockshop:

Robert C. Peterson
FAMILY ROOMS, DENS & STUDIOS | Sunset Books ©1979

drydockshop:

Robert C. Peterson

FAMILY ROOMS, DENS & STUDIOS | Sunset Books ©1979

— 3 weeks ago with 32 notes
frolicingintheforest:

A spring house Daddy built. A house built over a spring, with a trough in the cellar which holds the cold water, used for keeping things chilled, kind of like a natural refrigerator! I think this is so cool! And check out that stained glass window! (:

frolicingintheforest:

A spring house Daddy built. A house built over a spring, with a trough in the cellar which holds the cold water, used for keeping things chilled, kind of like a natural refrigerator! I think this is so cool! And check out that stained glass window! (:

(via tinyhousedarling)

— 3 weeks ago with 328 notes

hellotinyhome:

WHY TINY? 

To get grounded, to get free.

The above pictures (taken from the web) are of Curry Village in Yosemite National Park, where I lived and worked nearly twenty years ago. Myself, along with most employees in the park, lived in these clustered tent cabins. We worked and played, hiked and swam, made art and music, read books, and cooked in our free time, which we had a lot of. The tent cabin, no larger than 10 x 10 feet, was mostly a place to rest, to store my belongings. The rest of my days were spent out of doors, not in the recreational sense, as we tend to think when we think of a national park, but in the sense of literally living outside of my home.

It was an idyllic setting, living at the base of a peaceful valley amongst the backdrop of sublime glacial walls. The simplicity of my home, my lack of possessions, the abundance of friends at my doorstep, the secret swimming holes, the night sky as my theater - I can’t recall a time in my life that I felt more free. Granted, I had far less responsibility than I do now, but perhaps that is the essence of what tiny living is about. 

Since then I have lived in a few other small dwellings. For most of my twenties I insisted that all of my possessions should fit in the back of a van. I needed a physical limit to what I considered to be enough. I spent three years in a 200 square foot studio basement apartment in San Francisco. And another eight months in a 1950s mobile trailer on the turquoise shores of Abel Tasman, New Zealand. These sort of conditions seem to suit me. They provide a nest, a place of solitude for my introverted nature, yet they are too small to spend significant amounts of time in. They encourage stepping outside more often, staying in tune with one’s surroundings, whether that be a forest or city block, a neighbor or a bird.

Small quarters limit our ability to acquire. It creates a framework for making consolations and compromises. It helps us evaluate what is essential and worthy of our time, our money, our attention. It is truly remarkable how little I actually need to be content. I’ve been testing the boundaries of this, and have found for myself, the more that I own and the more that I want, the more burdened I feel. The conscious choice to live with less, for myself, is akin to freedom. There are plenty of inspirational quotes that say that far more eloquently. You’ve probably heard them. 

That said, we’re all in need of shelter, and have different perspectives on what is enough depending on an infinite number of factors. I’ve been rambling for most of my life and at some point felt that I needed a HOME. A physical place to ground me, a place to return to. Though personally, I don’t care to get weighed down by mortgage payments, home maintenance and decoration. Maybe I’m just lazy. Who knows. Who cares. What matters is that I’ve had a taste of what it means to live with less responsibility, and it’s more joyful. I’m referring to a personal kind of responsibility - the kind that has everything to do with me, my comfort level, my preferences, my status. It is an entirely self-imposed responsibility based on distinct life choices.

I can live in a very small home, with fewer possessions, and still be a highly responsible adult. In fact, I’d argue that it makes me more responsible to my community and society as a whole.

I know myself.

(via becausetinyhouse)

— 3 weeks ago with 68 notes
cabinporn:

Backyard “Tea Shed” in Clinton Hill, Brooklyn, NY.
Contributed by Ben Dickinson.

cabinporn:

Backyard “Tea Shed” in Clinton Hill, Brooklyn, NY.

Contributed by Ben Dickinson.

(via tinyhousedarling)

— 3 weeks ago with 1273 notes
cabinporn:

Ancient shepherd shelter in Val Brembana, Bergamo, Italy.
Contributed by Carlo Catellani.

cabinporn:

Ancient shepherd shelter in Val Brembana, Bergamo, Italy.

Contributed by Carlo Catellani.

— 3 weeks ago with 789 notes
chasingthegreenfaerie:

Pin by Stephanie on Dream House | Pinterest on We Heart It.

chasingthegreenfaerie:

Pin by Stephanie on Dream House | Pinterest on We Heart It.

— 2 months ago with 8 notes
manofwick:

Norwegian Koiene (Little Cabin)
from livingoffthegrid (originally tinyhouseblog)

manofwick:

Norwegian Koiene (Little Cabin)

from livingoffthegrid (originally tinyhouseblog)

(via tinyhousedarling)

— 2 months ago with 209 notes